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2021: When the link between climate and biodiversity crises became obvious | Max Benato

2021: When the link between climate and biodiversity crises became obvious | Max Benato

The mineral spodumene, which occurs in various shades of pink, green and grey, all of which contain lithium, a metal that is key to greener technology.

BAts swelteringThey are narwhals, polar bears, and polar bears in their boxes To survive, you will need to consume up to four times the energyBirds are starving Turkey’s lakes dry up, Unique island speciesAs the planet heats, there is a high chance of their extinction. There is no doubt about the The climate emergency and biodiversity crisis are inextricably linkedThese doubts were thankfully dispelled in 2021.

“The science is clear: climate, biodiversity and human health are fully interdependent,” Frans Timmermans, the European Commission vice-president who heads the European Green Deal; Achim Steiner, of the UN Development Programme; and Sandrine Dixson-Declève, of the Club of Rome, Before the Cop26Climate conference.

Cop15 Kunming was held, the highly-anticipated Cop15 Kunming conference on biodiversity was Yet again, delayedCop26 brought together leaders around the world to discuss the climate emergency. Although pledges to reduce emissions fell short of the ones required to limit temperature rise to 1.5C, they were nevertheless made. Global deforestation can be stopped and reversedOver the next decade.

Meanwhile, dozens of countries have committed to protecting 30% of the planet’s land and oceans by 2030, and in September, nine philanthropic foundations $5bn pledged (£3.75bn) to finance the 30×30 pledge.

Despite the coronavirus pandemic and the many lockdowns, 2021 saw the world’s scientists, volunteers and conservationists continuing their efforts to protect nature. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) launched its new green listResearch at the Natural History MuseumKenya held its first conference on digitizing its vast collection. First animal census, and a Multimillion-pound Project was launched that aims to describe and identify the web of life in large freshwater ecosystems with “game-changing” DNA technology.

September saw the release of IUCN World Conservation Congress in MarseilleBringing together policymakers and innovators from all over the world, the conference featured talks and debates on topics such as the universal declaration about the rights of the river and alien species, human-wildlife conflicts, smart technology in conservation, and genetic engineering.

The mineral spodumene, which occurs in various shades of pink, green and grey, all of which contain lithium, a metal that is key to greener technology.
While its doors were closed to the public because of Covid-19, the Natural History Museum’s scientists and researchers were busy digitising its vast collection.Photograph: David Levene/The Guardian

However, scientists and policymakers don’t have to be the only ones who make conservation efforts. We are increasingly aware of the important role that communities and indigenous peoples play in conserving biodiversity, and building livelihoods. This year, we highlighted projects that included: Shade-grown coffeePeru: The islanders of Peru rally to save the country coco de merSeychelles: Nut Army of nature recorders Seed conserversThe UK.

There was also good news elsewhere. The Flatpack homes are available for animals that have been evictedThe wildfires we highlighted in April are now being tested in Sydney. a “housing estate”One of the biodegradable cardboard boxes has been set up to provide shelter for wildlife after bushfires.

In response to our piece on conservationists criticising Marks & Spencer for 30 million honeybees to be releasedThe 500-store British retailer featured little signs informing customers about the importance of native bees in the production of a variety of foods. M&S has been “really open to learning”, said Gill Perkins, chief executive of the Bumblebee Conservation Trust, who believes it is the first UK supermarket to introduce bumblebee labels highlighting the work of these pollinators. She hopes that others will follow her lead.

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Inuksuk on snow. northern lights

Andrew Kerr spoke to The Guardian about Want to start a UK eel rehabilitation program?In January, he met with the relevant ministry to discuss the possibility of obtaining rewilding permits for the upcoming eel season.

Since our last report on the proposals for expanding Barcelona airport threatening neighbouring wetlandsThe plans are based on a rich biodiversity and have been approved. Put on hold. Although the fate of the North Carolina red wolf is uncertain, the US Fish and Wildlife Service states that it is making plans. To free nine wolves held in captivityThis winter. An experimental feeding program has also been approved. Florida’s manateesAfter a record number of deaths, the government has declared victory.

Over the coming weeks, we will follow up on some of the stories that we covered during 2021 in more depth, but in the meantime, you might like to take a look at some of our favourite articles from the year that celebrate the planet’s beautiful and intricate biodiversity: why we need to stop treating soil like dirtThe wonderful world of fungi; The value of dead woodHow to a Wild night outcould help you reconnect to nature; and, finally, a lesson in how some things are It’s worth waiting, especially when they turn out like this …

Moonflower: timelapse of rare Amazonian cactus blooming for one night only – video
Moonflower: timelapse of rare Amazonian cactus blooming for one night only – video

Find out more Here is the coverage on age of extinctionFollow biodiversity reporters Phoebe Weston Patrick GreenfieldFollow Twitter for the latest news and features



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