Now Reading
Climate change is responsible for the loss of several DECADES of ice annually on Mount Everest, a study warns.

Climate change is responsible for the loss of several DECADES of ice annually on Mount Everest, a study warns.

New research has revealed how Mount Everest's highest glacier, South Col Glacier, is losing decades-worth of ice annually amid rising temperatures

It’s the ultimate challenge for climbers around the world, but the option to climb Mount Everest could be at risk – thanks to Climate Change.

New research has shown that Mount Everest’s highest glacier, South Col Glacier (the South Col Glacier), is losing decades of ice every year amid rising temperatures.

Worryingly, this could result in more avalanches, decreased water supply, upon whom more than one million people depend for drinking and irrigation.

According to researchers from the University of California, Mount Everest could be more difficult to scale due to increased melting. Maine.

Mariusz Potocki, a glaciochemist, said that the climate predictions for Himalaya suggest continued warming. He also predicted that glacier mass losses would continue. Even the top end of Everest could be impacted by anthropogenic sources warming.

New research has revealed how Mount Everest's highest glacier, South Col Glacier, is losing decades-worth of ice annually amid rising temperatures

New research has shown that Mount Everest’s highest glacier South Col Glacier is losing decades worth of ice each year due to rising temperatures.

The Everest Expedition 

The 2019 National Geographic and Rolex Perpetual Planet Everest Expedition were the largest scientific expedition to Mount Everest in human history. 

The team also installed two weather stations as part of the study and collected an ice core at the summit of Mount Everest.

The highest weather stations in all of the world are located at 27,657ft (8.420m) and 26,066ft (7.945m).

The ice core was also taken at 26,312ft (8.020 meters), making it the highest of its kind.

The findings come from the 2019 National Geographic and Rolex Perpetual Planet Everest Expedition – the most comprehensive single scientific expedition to Mount Everest in history.

The team also installed two weather stations and collected an ice core at the summit of Mount Everest as part of the study.

The highest weather stations in all of the world are located at 27,657ft (8.420m) and 26,066ft (7.945m).

The ice core was then taken at 26,312ft (8.020m), making it one of the highest known specimens of its kind.

Analysing the ice core revealed that the ice thinning rate was approximately 6.5ft (2 meters) per year.

According to researchers, this is due to the fact that the glacier changed from snowpack into ice. This means that it has lost its ability of reflecting solar radiation and has been melting more quickly.

Worryingly, these findings also suggest that the glacier has thinned by around 180ft (55 meters) in the last quarter-century, thinning more than 80 times faster then the nearly 2,000 years it took for it to form.

South Col Glacier is very exposed. This means that although warming air temperatures are the main cause of melting, strong winds are also a factor.

The findings come from the 2019 National Geographic and Rolex Perpetual Planet Everest Expedition – the most comprehensive single scientific expedition to Mount Everest in history

The findings come from the 2019 National Geographic and Rolex Perpetual Planet Everest Expedition – the most comprehensive single scientific expedition to Mount Everest in history

Overall, the findings point out the critical balance that snow-covered surfaces offer Mount Everest.

The researchers wrote in their paper: “Everest’s highest Glacier has served as a sendinel for this delicate equilibrium and has demonstrated that even Earth’s roof is impacted by anthropogenic Source Warming.”

The team hopes that the findings will be used to highlight the widespread effects of rising temperatures all over the globe.

Paul Mayewski, co-author of the study, added: ‘It answers one of the big questions posed by our 2019 NGS/Rolex Mount Everest Expedition — whether the highest glaciers on the planet are impacted by human-source climate change. 

As part of the study, the team installed two weather stations, and collected an ice core from the top of Mount Everest. Red arrow indicates where the ice core was taken, while the yellow arrow shows the location of the Balcony weather station

The team installed two weather stations and gathered an ice core from Mount Everest. The red arrow indicates the location of the ice core, while the yellow one shows the location for the Balcony weather station.

“The answer is a clear yes, and it has been a significant improvement since the late 90s. 

The University of Leeds researchers warned that the study was imminent. Himalayan glaciers melting at an “exceptional rate” and could threaten the supply of water for hundreds of millions of people in Asia.

Researchers found that Himalayan glaciers have lost ice 10 times more quickly over the last few decades – predominantly since the year 2000 – than on average since the Little Ice Age hundreds of years ago. 

The Little Ice Age was an era of major mountain-glacier growth that spanned the period from the early 14th Century through the mid-century. It saw rivers freeze over and crops die.  

The study also revealed that Himalayan glaciers are now shrinking faster than other glaciers around the world, which is increasing sea levels. 

This accelerating melting has implications for hundreds of millions of residents who depend on Asia’s major rivers for food and energy – including the Brahmaputra, Ganges and Indus. 

CLIMBING MOUNTEVEREST

Everest is the tallest mountain in the world and lies at the border of Nepal & Tibet. 

Its height is controversial. Different methods of measuring it produce different results.

See Also
Why you should teach about climate change this Earth Day

However, the general consensus is Mt Everest sits 29,029ft (8,848m) above sea level.

Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay were the first to reach the summit on May 29 1953 as part of the British expedition led by Lord John Hunt.

Everest had been climbed 6,871 more times by 4,042 mountaineers as of February 2014. 

Tragically, 265 people were killed while climbing Everest between 1922 & 2014.

On April 18 2014, 16 high-altitude workers were killed in the Khumbu Icefall below Camp 1 when a block of glacial ice collapsed.

These workers often act in the role of guides and carry supplies up the mountain for hikers. 

Most expeditions last around two months. 

Alpine AscentsIt is recommended to spend at least one year training specifically for Everest climbing. 

To safely and effectively build your climbing-specific condition, you will need a gradual increase in your hike time, distance, elevation gain (at around 10 percent per week). 

To reach the summit, those who are aiming to do so should have completed expeditions above 20,000ft (6.096m). 

You have the ability to ‘deal with equipment’ as well as ‘handling extreme cold temperatures and high altitude’. 

Nearly all Everest climbers use a commercial expedition operator. 

Prices vary from $65,000 (around £50,250) to $35,000 (£27,060). A tax of around $11,000 (£8,500) also goes to the Nepali Government.

And each climber has to pay $600 (£460) to the Sagarmatha Pollution Control Committee.

All expedition operators must have life and helicopter insurance.  

Source: BMC 

View Comments (0)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.