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Climate change: The Arctic fails its annual check-up

Climate change: The Arctic fails its annual check-up

A Tuesday report that serves as an Arctic annual physical was published This biome is a vast and important oneThe landscape is changing rapidly. It continues to heat twice the Earth’s surface and is rapidly losing ice. The landscape has transformed from one that was reliably frozen to one that is greener and more brown than it was a decade ago.
The Arctic Report Card, published in NOAA by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), was authored more than 100 scientists. It examines changes in snow cover and tundra vegetation as well as sea ice volume.Temperatures of the ocean and surface airFrom October 2020 to September 2021

The report also mentions an increase in commercial activities, as well as ships that are venturing further into Arctic waters on routes open to them by melting ice. They bring more trash and noise to the area, changing its soundscape and interfering in marine mammals’ communication.

The loss of life, economy and infrastructure is also possible due to retreating glaciers or melting permafrost.

“If you realize that the Arctic is the gateway to climate changes, and that we need some way of taking a regular pulse-check on how things are in that critical region, the report card represents, as you will, a little snapshot,” Richard Spinrad, NOAA Administrator, told CNN.

He explained that it was important because it is similar to going to the doctor for an annual physical. “You want to have a consistent, comparable set.

It all connects

Three extremes occurred on the Greenland Ice Sheet this summer melt eventsAccording to the report, the data was collected over the entire period. Twila Moon, the lead editor and scientist at the Arctic Research Institute, is a good choice for people who live far away from the Arctic. National Snow and Ice Data Center, explains how it all connects, especially when it is about ice melt.
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Sea levels rise when the Greenland ice sheets melts. This can have a strong impact on coastal areas and other low-lying islands in the Pacific Islands. These impacts can result in coastal erosion, saltwater intrusion in freshwater resources, and disruptions of sewer and water systems.

The Arctic’s melting permafrost also releases more greenhouse gases into our atmosphere, further increasing the planet’s warming.

Moon said that the Arctic report card for this year shows how connected we are to the environmental changes taking place around the world and how these cascading disruptions may influence other parts.

“We now live in a time fundamentally different than the past and will continue to experience ongoing change into the future.”

A recent scientific report about the region revealed that the Arctic Ocean was WarmingSince the The 20th century beganIt was actually decades earlier than we thought.

The year studied was seventh warmest in Arctic history, but the period between October and December 2020 was the warmest. The Arctic continues its upward trend in warming, more than twice that of the rest.

The summer brought with it higher-than-usual temperatures. An August heatwave caused rain to fall on Greenland’s summitFor the first time ever, snow was used instead of snowThe summit reached temperatures above freezing for the third consecutive decade. The warm air also fueled an extreme rainfall event that dumped 7 million tons of water on the glacier.
A Published reportThis was confirmed by the event. The Arctic is likely to see more rain than snow sometime between 2060-2070. This will mark a major shift in its precipitation patterns, as the climate crisis raises temperatures in the region.
Michelle McCrystall (climate researcher at the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg), said that things that happen in Arctic don’t necessarily stay there. CNN, previously. “The possibility of an increase in permafrost melt emissions or an increase global sea level rise is a global problem that requires a global solution.”

Ships, beavers, and permafrost dangers

The NOAA report card also revealed, using satellite images and other data that North American beavers are occupying the Arctic tundra of Alaska. This has doubled their ponds over the past two decades. Scientists are also mapping beaver lakes in Canada and Asia.

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Because of this, it’s a problem Beavers can gnaw through and fall trees and create dams. These can flood valleys and create new lakes, which contribute to the melting of frozen permafrost soil. When permafrost melts it releases large amounts of methane, a more powerful greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide.

The increasing shipping traffic to the Arctic is due to both the shrinking sea ice and the shifting marine habitats. According to the report, increasing human activity is causing a dramatic change in the marine soundscape.

Spinrad explained to CNN that if one of your lights flickers in your home, it could be a problem with the electricity.

“But if you notice that all the lights are flickering and the air conditioning isn’t working, and there are leaks in the water pipes, you’d think we have a serious issue with the whole home, not just a few incidents.”

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Spinrad stated that the Arctic is fundamentally different than the one it has known for centuries or even decades. It’s the accumulation of a warmer, wetter, less-icy, greener, and more diverse Arctic.

Ice and icebergs float in the distance in Disko Bay in September 2021 in Ilulissat, Greenland.

The report revealed that as the planet warms, retreating glaciers, and thawing Permafrost are already threatening five million people who live in the Northern Hemisphere’s permafrost area. This creates a cascading effect on economies, infrastructure, national security, and the well-being of Arctic communities.

Glacial retreat can also expose steep slopes that are already difficult to destabilize. This, in the presence of deep waters, can lead to landslide-fueled tsunamis or flooding, which could potentially lead to death, the report states.

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The report has seen an increase in tundra greenness over the last year. However, recent extremes and other local influences like wildfires and melting permafrost may be causing the landscape to turn browner.

Moon stated that the entire world is feeling the effects of the climate crisis and that people should be able empathize with the Arctic communities.

Moon stated that the Arctic people are also experiencing extreme events and conditions they have never seen or had to deal with before.

“So on a very personal scale, we find ourselves in a new world that has fundamentally changed from the environmental conditions of the past many decades or centuries.”

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