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Many migrants travelling between Nogales (Mexico) and Arizona are being killed by the climate crisis.

Many migrants travelling between Nogales (Mexico) and Arizona are being killed by the climate crisis.

The image shows recorded deaths of 93 men (top) and 28 women (bottom) who were travelling on foot in southern Arizona. The black dots indicate individual deaths, while red coloring indicates regions in which deaths are most likely to be recorded

Migrants crossing the US border from Mexico are being killed by the climate crisis MexicoA new study has found that.

Many people have died on the dangerous journey due to dehydration. But, American scientists have found that the majority of travelers die in the area between Nogales Mexico and Three Point. Arizona. This is a region in the Sonoran Desert.

The study revealed that the area is home to the most likely areas of evaporated water loss.

The trekkers can experience disorientation, organ failure, and even death. According to researchers, more men have died due to dehydration that women.

According to the study, people will lose one-third of their water every 30 years, even if they have an ‘intermediate mitigation’ scenario.

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The image shows recorded deaths of 93 men (top) and 28 women (bottom) who were travelling on foot in southern Arizona. The black dots indicate individual deaths, while red coloring indicates regions in which deaths are most likely to be recorded

The image shows the recorded deaths of 93 and 28 men (top and bottom) who were on foot in southern Arizona. The black dots denote individual deaths, and the red color indicates the regions where most deaths are likely to be recorded.

Scientists from the University of Idaho (Princeton University), the University of California (University of Wisconsin) conducted the study to determine the costs of the migrant trip in terms of water loss through respiration and sweating. Then they looked at how the variations in those costs correlated with patterns of migrant deaths.

Ryan Long, associate Professor of Wildlife Sciences at the University of Idaho and senior Author of the study, stated in a Statement: ‘Over many decades, thousands of children, men, and women have died trying to bypass border protection and cross from Mexico to the United States.

“Because the U.S. official ports are heavily fortified, many migrants attempt entry by crossing remote desert regions.

The team determines which parts of the crossing are most dangerous by using geo-referenced records for adult male and female deaths from 1981 to 2019. They focus on those who died between May & September, when the hottest weather hits and most migrants die. Carbon Brief reports.

It has been known that many people making the dangerous journey die of dehydration, but a team of American scientists found that most travelers die in the area between Nogales, Mexico and Three Point, Arizona. This is a region within the Sonoran desert (stock)

It is well-known that many people who make the dangerous journey to Mexico die from dehydration. However, a team American scientists discovered that most travelers die in the region between Nogales (Mexico) and Three Point (Arizona). This area is located in the Sonoran desert (stock).

The study shows the amount of drinking water carried by a typical migrant is likely not sufficient to prevent severe dehydration, and this deficit will only increase as the climate warms. Pictured are water bottles found along the route to the US

The study shows that the average migrant has less water than necessary to prevent severe dehydration. As the climate warms, this will only increase. These are water bottles that were found on the way to the US.

Using the Niche Mapper biophysical model, scientists then calculated how much people dehydrate at different points of the trip.

This allowed them pinpoint the most likely areas for people to become dehydrated.

Different levels of dehydration were then given: from ‘severe dehydration’, in which people lose over 10 percent of their body mass in a single day from water loss, to ‘mild dehydration’ in which people lose zero to five percent. 

The study includes quotes by migrants who crossed the Mediterranean, who describe their experiences and one who describes the extent of dehydration.

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Lucho, a 47 year-old Mexican migrant, stated in June 2009 that he was dying from thirst. At that moment, I was hallucinating. Although we were surrounded with dirt, I was able to see water in the desert. 

Taking a deeper look, the team found that people will experience more water loss in June. The black dots indicate individual deaths, while red coloring indicates regions in which deaths are most likely to be recorded

The team discovered that June will be a month of greater water loss. The black dots indicate individual deaths; the red coloring indicates regions where most deaths are likely to occur.

Data shows that a 152-pound pregnant lady would lose two gallons of water per day on average, while a 41 pound five-year old would lose five cups. 

Further investigation revealed that June will see people experience greater water loss.

Long stated that the study showed that the average migrant has less than enough water to avoid severe dehydration. This deficit will only increase with increasing temperatures. 

Long stated, “We provide the first empirical proof that the physiological stresses that humans experience crossing the Sonoran Desert into America are sufficient to cause severe hypohydration and associated conditions which can lead to death,” 

“Our study supports the idea that patterns of migrant death in the desert can be explained through spatiotemporal variation of the physiological costs encountered during the journey; a large proportion of migrant deaths occurs in areas where water loss is predicted to be the highest. 

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