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Natural gas bans: Can we slow global warming while still eating well?

Natural gas bans: Can we slow global warming while still eating well?

Natural gas bans: Can you slow global warming and still eat well?

Natural gas emissions contributing to the problem of global warming are small compared with emissions from the largest polluters –  transportation and electricity production. In an effort to reduce future building emissions, dozens of cities, from New York to San Francisco, have banned gas hookups in new construction. 

People who love cooking with gas seem to be the ones that get the most reactions. Their culinary angst – along with reaction from advocates of fuel choice – has sparked a blowback of bans on the bans. Some localities have passed laws that prohibit the restriction of new natural gas connections.

This is Why We Did It

Many cities across the country are banning natural gas hookups, resulting in culinary anxiety for gas-loving chefs. It’s one reason many locales are banning the gas bans.

“With all the progress that we’ve made over the last 10 years or so in terms of changes to the electrical grid with the shift away from coal, it’s now becoming the case that the next sector that should be the obvious target of policies to reduce emissions” is natural gas, says Jonathan Buonocore, research scientist at Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Nora Singley is a professional food stylist and downplays the concern. Even though she prefers the control of heat that gas gives her in the kitchen, “it would just be a period of acclimating,” because there are good gas-free electric ranges.

Washington

Since the dawn of time, humans have been cooking over fire. Millennia. With concerns about rising greenhouse gas emissions, some cities are banning natural gasoline in their future kitchens. This poses a policy dilemma: How can we slow global warming while still eating healthy?

Hundreds of jurisdictions, from Brookline, Massachusetts to San Francisco, have banned new gas hookups for heating or cooking. Last month brought its heft to the trend, setting restrictions on fossil fuel usage in new buildings by phasing in emissions limits beginning next year.

The bans placed on flame cooking have sparked a backlash from chefs who feel the bans are unfair. Some Localities and at least 19 states have passed laws to prevent municipalities from restricting new natural gas connections. Also behind these actions: gas-industry lobbying for “Energy choice” and broader legislative tussling along party lines.

This is Why We Did It

Many cities across the country are banning natural gas hookups, resulting in culinary anxiety for gas-loving chefs. It’s one reason many locales are banning the gas bans.

“With all the progress that we’ve made over the last 10 years or so in terms of changes to the electrical grid with the shift away from coal, it’s now becoming the case that the next sector that should be the obvious target of policies to reduce emissions has changed,” says Jonathan Buonocore, research scientist at Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health. He says that natural gas is now a major target.

Safety and pollution

Methane, which is released from natural gas systems accounts for approximately 3% of all U.S. greenhouse gas emissionsAccording to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Also, be aware of the following: ExistenceNatural gas is an indoor air pollutant.

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