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Scientists warn that climate change has increased the danger of deadly floods in South Africa.

Scientists warn that climate change has increased the danger of deadly floods in South Africa.

People stand near the remains of a building destroyed during flooding at the KwaNdengezi Station, near Durban, South Africa, April 16, 2022. / Credit: ROGAN WARD / REUTERS

Last month, South Africa was hit hard by flooding. It killed at least 448 people and caused more than 40,000 displacements. According to a New analysisPublished Friday, the devastation caused by climate change was even more severe.

In mid-April, torrential rains poured down on South Africa. This caused massive floods in KwaZulu-Natal and Eastern Cape provinces. The president of the nation called it “a tragedy.” Katastrophes of epic proportions.” Many people lost loved one while they slept in the middle night. One man claimed that he lost 10 relatives who were asleep in their house when the flooding struck. Another woman shared the story of how her daughters, aged 11 and 17, were swept away while they slept in their shack.

Nearly 400 people died in flash floods this week in South Africa’s Kwazulu–Natal Province. Bonakele Mtshali and her two daughters, aged 11 and 17, were among those killed. Mtshali stated that her daughters were asleep at the time when the floods swept their shack away. https://t.co/RtFaMV5fz2 pic.twitter.com/Q0csOyFSce

— CBS News (@CBSNews) April 15, 2022

Nearly 14 inches of rain fell on the region between April 11 and 12, a total that scientists from World Weather Attribution Global Initiative described as “extremely large” for a two day period.

According to scientists’ analysis, Global warmingThe event was made more likely. Although their findings are not yet peer-reviewed, the group relies upon peer-reviewed methods for conducting their research.

Scientists concluded that both aerosol and greenhouse gases are responsible for the observed rises. . “… Human-induced climate change has nearly doubled the probability of an event like the one that led to this disaster.

People stand near the remains of a building destroyed during flooding at the KwaNdengezi Station, near Durban, South Africa, April 16, 2022. / Credit: ROGAN WARD / REUTERSPeople stand near the remains of a building destroyed during flooding at the KwaNdengezi Station, near Durban, South Africa, April 16, 2022. / Credit: ROGAN WARD / REUTERS

People stand near the remains a building that was destroyed by flooding at the KwaNdengezi Station near Durban, South Africa on April 16, 2022. / Credit: ROGAN WOARD / REUTERS

Lead author of the analysis was climate analyst Izidine Pinto To avoid the worst effects of future disasters, adaptation is key.

Pinto stated that “We must drastically reduce greenhouse gases emissions and adapt our lives to a new reality, where floods and heatwaves can be more intense and destructive.”

These risks have been known for years by scientists. The latest analysis is a stark reminder of how harmful fossil fuels and greenhouse gases are to humanity’s ability of survival. Emissions form a dense layer in our atmosphere, trapping heat and causing global average temperatures to rise.

As the Earth’s oceans heat, water evaporates more, creating a warmer planet. heavier rainfallMore intense storms are possible Flooding.

Scientists concluded that climate change has increased the risk of extreme rainfall events like those in South Africa last month. If the world was 1.2 degrees Celsius cooler than it is now — roughly the average Before industrialization — their analysis found an event like this would happen about once every 40 years. In today’s climate, it will happen approximately every 20 years. As a result, rainfall is expected to be 4%-8% higher.

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Extreme weather events can be devastating for areas that are economically disadvantaged, just as in South Africa. In this particular case, scientists pointed to governance challenges, older infrastructure and a poor warning system — challenges that are It is found in many places around the globe..

The report states, “If cities continue their development in ways that concentrate the poorest, most marginalised people into flood prone, high-risk zones, they will continue being most affected when (sic] disaster strikes.” Although the rainfall was severe, this type event is not uncommon and is likely to occur again with greater intensity in future.

Reporting by the Associated Press was also provided by them.

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