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Shell board warned by Environment group about the liability of Shell for achieving emission targets

Shell board warned by Environment group about the liability of Shell for achieving emission targets

A Shell logo is found on a London petrol station pump, April 28, 2010. REUTERS/Toby Melville/File photo

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AMSTERDAM (Reuters) – Shell’s board has been warned by a group that won a victory last year over the Dutch energy giant Shell (SHEL.L). The Dutch court ordered Shell to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and it must implement the verdict.

Last year, the Hague District Court ordered Shell to reduce carbon emissions by 45% by 2030 compared to 2019 levels. This landmark decision could have significant implications for energy companies all over the world. Continue reading

Shell is appealing against this ruling

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Friends of the Earth/Milieudefensie stated that it sent a letter on Sunday to the company’s boards, as well as individual representatives, including CEO Ben van Beurden, stating that it was not taking any action to implement the verdict.

“Shell has appealed but the court declared that the judgment provisionally enforceable means that the necessary climate action cannot being suspended pending the appeal,” the letter stated. Reuters was able to see a copy of the letter.

“Milieudefensie believes Shell’s directors are at risk of future personal liability if they fail to take action to achieve the… goal, almost halving global CO2 emissions by 2030.”

Shell, which claims it adheres to the ruling in all respects, couldn’t immediately be reached for comment.

See Also

The company appealed in March to the court, arguing that it was wrongly held responsible for emissions it couldn’t control. Continue reading

Shell has set its targets to reduce its emissions by 50% by 2030. However, it uses carbon storage and offsets in its strategy rather than relying on outright reductions.

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Reporting by Toby Sterling
Robert Birsel edits

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