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To combat climate change, put aside partisanship

To combat climate change, put aside partisanship

In September 2015, a hotel guest carries his shoes as he returns to his car during tidal street flooding in Miami Beach.  Environmental and other organizations say Florida's elected leaders need to address the consequences of climate change and sea level rise.

In September 2015, a hotel guest carries his shoes as he returns to his car during tidal street flooding in Miami Beach.  Environmental and other organizations say Florida's elected leaders need to address the consequences of climate change and sea level rise.

Last year, Senator Marco Rubio (R. Fla.) introduced and ushered through Congress The Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act. President Joe Biden signed it into law in December. It is horrendous to think that slaves are still held. To stop the slave-made goods from being sold here in the U.S., is one step towards helping these slaves. This bill demonstrates that bipartisan unity is at its fullest support for slave labor.

This nonpartisan bill was important for our trade practices with China and the Uyghur workforce. It needed to be passed. It was supported by both parties. This bipartisan support must address the serious problems that we face today. We don’t have time for partisan politics. 

Climate change is one such issue that requires immediate, nonpartisan action. We all know that Florida is a state that must act quickly and we are all aware of the urgency of this issue. Already, Miami Beach is fighting rising waters. Rising seas are already threatening Miami. It is actually the most at-risk U.S. town from sea level rise. The Everglades, Florida Keys, and other coastal Florida areas are just a few examples of sea-level lands that are at risk.

Susan Nugent:

Carbon reckoning should be included in self-evaluation

We have waited too long to see climate action.

High hopes for UN Conference on Climate Change

By 2030, sea level rise will be between 2-10 inches. Storm surges will be greater, coastal homes will be vulnerable and all of the state’s coastal areas will be changed. Rising ocean and seawater intrusion could have a negative impact on roads, sewage systems and agriculture, as well as drinking water. 

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