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300 scientists spend year in Arctic for answers to climate crisis

300 scientists spend year in Arctic for answers to climate crisis

Ice conditions around the vessel

The £122million MOSAiC project – dubbed “the modern climate science equivalent of going to the moon” – was funded by governments, businesses and academic institutions from 20 countries

Ice conditions around the vessel
The mission’s purpose was to collect as much data from as many remote areas of the globe as possible in one go.

300 scientists from around the world spent a year in Arctic to find answers that would help us solve the climate crisis.

Global warming is having a greater effect than anywhere else on the planet, except at the polar Ice Caps, which are heating at twice the rate as everywhere else.

The region could see its summer sea ice disappear by 2050. This would lead to a catastrophic rise in global sea levels, and a massive disruption to our lives. weather patterns.

The £122million MOSAiC project – dubbed “the modern climate science equivalent of going to the moon” – was funded by governments, businesses and academic institutions from 20 countries.

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The film was shown at COP26 summit (file).
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Its purpose was to collect as many data as possible from the most remote regions of the globe in one shot.

Amy Macfarlane (a snow physicist and 27-year-old from Manchester) was among those scientists and researchers who were sent as deep as an icebreaker could.

The team was then left in an ice floe for one year while they retrieved valuable data that was previously impossible to obtain.

Amy and her colleagues braved severe weather and possible attacks by polar bears to search for the answers that will transform our understanding of climate change. Amy said: “At one point we were down to around -40C.

“You’re carrying heavy equipment and the clothing is also heavy.

“I was working on the ice, going out every day for almost eight months, so it really puts a lot of stress on your body.”

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A film crew followed the Polarstern expedition on the German Icebreaker Polarstern. This expedition was 10 years in planning.

The documentary was then shown at COP26 summit.

Amy explained how Amy and her team examined the fates of sea ice as well as the oceans and atmosphere systems for their first time.

Worryingly, the ice was thinner than they expected.

Amy said: “We know the steps to take and how important it is to take them – it’s just how quickly we can put them into place.

“What keeps me optimistic is that I think the motivation is there to do it.”

  • Arctic Drift is available to stream online on All 4.


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