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Help Environmental Learning Center purchase new kayaks for exploring the lagoon

Help Environmental Learning Center purchase new kayaks for exploring the lagoon

Renae Brock (left) a volunteer at the Environmental Learning Center, explains about a hermit crab to students (from left) Michael Fry, 6, Rodrigo Rivers, 7, and Shelby Douglas, 7, during the center's outdoor summer camp, which moved indoors due to rain on Tuesday, June 22, 2021, at the ELC grounds in Wabasso. "The touch tank, we have a whole bunch of critters for them to look at, they are all lagoon animals, so it helps them get familiar with local species," said Delaney Farrell, staff assistant environmental educator at the ELC. "So when they're out in the lagoon they can ID stuff and know what it is, and it  helps them learn. And its hands on learning which makes it fun." Information on the Environmental Learning Center summer camps can be found on their website https://www.discoverelc.org/summer-camps.

After years of being on the water, the Environmental Learning CenterThere are many replacements needed for the kayaks that have been badly damaged.

The nonprofit based in Vero Beach is looking for funding to purchase six new kayaks as part of its “12 Days of Christmas” wish. Three tandemsAnd Three singlesAccording to Sue Harr who is the center’s relationship specialist and experience specialist.

“Our current fleet is showing signs wear from constant use. Harr stated that it is time to retire several of our kayaks and replace them with new or gently used kayaks with similar specifications.

The center offers guided tours for the general public and kayak rentals.

“Our kayak rentals are not only a source of income to support the ELCs educational programmes, but they also give our guests the chance to enjoy the natural beauty and tranquility that comes with spending time on the water. Indian River Lagoon.

The kayaks support the ELC’s educational mission of “educating, inspiring and empowering all people to be active Stewards of the Environment and their own Well-being.”

Renae Brock (left) a volunteer at the Environmental Learning Center, explains about a hermit crab to students (from left) Michael Fry, 6, Rodrigo Rivers, 7, and Shelby Douglas, 7, during the center's outdoor summer camp, which moved indoors due to rain on Tuesday, June 22, 2021, at the ELC grounds in Wabasso. "The touch tank, we have a whole bunch of critters for them to look at, they are all lagoon animals, so it helps them get familiar with local species," said Delaney Farrell, staff assistant environmental educator at the ELC. "So when they're out in the lagoon they can ID stuff and know what it is, and it  helps them learn. And its hands on learning which makes it fun." Information on the Environmental Learning Center summer camps can be found on their website https://www.discoverelc.org/summer-camps.

Renae (left) is a volunteer at Environmental Learning Center. She explains about a hermit cactus to students (from left: Michael Fry, 6, Rodrigo Rivers 7, and Shelby Douglas), during the center’s outdoor summer camp. The center moved indoors on Tuesday, June 22, 20,21 due to rain at the ELC grounds. Delaney Farrell (staff assistant environmental educator at ELC) said, “The touch tank, there are a lot of critters for them, they all come from the lagoon, so it helps them become familiar with local species.” “So they can identify stuff and know what it’s called, which helps them learn. It’s hands on learning that makes it so much fun. Information on the Environmental Learning Center summer camps can be found on their website https://www.discoverelc.org/summer-camps.

Harr stated that “our fleet of kayaks is a perfect way to venture out, explore the Indian River Lagoon,” one of North America’s most biodiverse estuaries,” Harr said. “They are great for family kayak trips, school groups, or corporate retreats that get our clients out into the natural world.”

The ELC was started in 1988 by a group environmental-minded people from the UK. Pelican Island Audubon SocietyAccording to the center, this was a man who valued the natural beauty found in the Indian River Lagoon.

According to the ELC, the founders had one mission: to preserve a 64-acre island in the lagoon and to create an educational program and water-based adventure to teach visitors about the surrounding biodiversity.

How can you help?

About this series

Treasure Coast nonprofits which advocate for clean drinking water, especially in the region of the Treasure Coast, are responsible for protecting, restoring, and advocating for it. St. Lucie River and Indian River LagoonTo continue their mission, they need more than holiday cheer. Find out what they need to continue their work and how you could help. TCPalm.comHighlights a different organization every day between Dec. 25 and Jan. 5, the traditional 12 Days Christmas. Check out the previous stories.

For more news, Follow Max Chesnes on twitter.

Max ChesnesTCPalm Environment Reporter – Focuses on issues facing the Indian River Lagoon, St. Lucie River & Lake Okeechobee. You can follow Max on Twitter @MaxChesnes, email him at max.chesnes@tcpalm.com and give him a call at 772-978-2224.

Max’s stories are available here.

This article first appeared in Treasure Coast Newspapers. 12 Days: Help Environmental Learning Center purchase six new kayaks

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